NEW:Update 99

This year the National Educator's Workshop (NEW:Update 99) was held in Dearborn and Auburn Hills, Michigan from October 31-November 3, 1999. This workshop gives instructors a chance to share tips, tricks and experiments used in the materials science laboratory courses being taught at universities, community colleges and technical schools and even high schools across north America.  The theme was Automotive Materials into the Future.  It was organized by Jim Jacobs at Norfolk State University and was sponsored by the Department of Energy, NASA, Norfolk State University, NIST, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Daimler-Chrysler Corporation, University of Michigan, Ford Motor Company, General Motors and the Gateway Engineering Coalition.


Ionic Bonding, An Introduction to Materials and to Spreadsheets
By: Mike Meier
This paper describes our computer  "experiment" in which the students calculate the attraction and repulsion energies involved in ionic bonding, combine them to obtain the net lattice energy as a function of ionic spacing, and then differentiate this to obtain the force-distance curves.  From these curves they determine the equilibrium atomic spacing, bond energy, bulk modulus and shear and young's moduli (requires an estimate of Poisson's ratio).  Finally, they estimate melting temperature.  This exercise works very well for all of the classic NaCl-type compounds; NaCl, KI, RbBr, LiF, etc.  In addition to the obvious materials science lessons involved here this exercise is also very effective in getting students to start utilizing spreadsheets in their laboratory experiments, homework, etc.  We have found that by starting the quarter with this experiment that students will start using spreadsheets to analyze and plot cooling curves in the Bi-Sn phase diagram experiment, to plot and analyze the data from their tensile tests and to compile and share data in their heat treatment experiment.  This one experiment has done much to improve the quality of work done in all of these other experiments.

Click here to view the paper or right-click and "Save As" to download it.

Attractive, repulsive and net lattice energy involved in ionic bonding
Lattice energy versus interatomic spacing.

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Four Windows Programs for the Materials Science Laboratory
By: Mike Meier
The four programs presented have been very useful in our laboratory courses.   Two of them aid in performing and teaching basic stereological techniques, another is very useful in our Jominy end-quench experiments and the fourth will save us a lot of money because it will allow us to use the sound card in a PC for data acquisition at rates up to 44 kHz and 8 or 16-bit sampling. I have made the programs that are (mostly) finished available for downloading from this site. You can download any of the files below by clicking the appropriate hyperlink.

Click here to view the paper or right-click and "Save As" to download it.

Your comments on any of the programs on this page are most welcome. Email to me at mlmeier@kstreetstudio.com.

Heyn's Method 2.02 - This program aids in using the mean lineal intercept method to measure grain size.  It handles data entry and the routine calculations plus it displays a histogram showing the measurements and the normal distribution, a helpful feature for those students new to statistics. (self-extracting zip file, 1.37 MB)

Point Count 2.02 - This program is similar in style, features and function to the Heyn's Method program except that it calculates the volume fraction of a phase based on the point count technique. It can also be used for measuring area fractions. (self-extracting zip file, 865 kB)

Jominy 2.02 - A program to calculate Jominy curves per ASTM A 255-89.  You can also enter your hardness measurements and plot them on the same graph as the calculated hardness profile. This program is finished except for a few details in the printing routines. Even so, version 3.0 is already in the works. It will allow you to enter minimum and maximum limits of alloying element concentrations and it will perform some basic statistical calculations on your data. (self-extracting zip file, 638 kB)

Audio Scope Screen Shot

Audio Scope 1.0 - This is a program that uses the sound card in your PC as a dual channel oscilloscope.  Granted, bandwidth is limited to 44 kHz but simultaneous sampling of two channels at 16-bits is possible.  Even with the limited bandwidth this program can be very useful when monitoring a host of phenomenon that your typical DMM/scanner is too slow to handle.  This program is not ready even for demonstrations, but when complete it will be able to display, record and playback monaural and stereo signals, whether they be sound, B-H curves or creep transients. Once this program is finished I will start working on an fft-version of the scope program and also a function generator program that uses the line-out feature of sound cards.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge Teaching Resources Center and the Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science at UC Davis for their support in the production of the videos and for attending the conference.

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