NEW:Update 2003

This year the National Educator's Workshop (NEW:Update 2003) was held in Newport News and Hampton, VA from October 19-22, 2003.  This workshop gives instructors a chance to share tips, tricks and experiments used in the materials science laboratory courses being taught at universities, community colleges and technical schools and even high schools across north America.  It was organized by Jim Jacobs at Norfolk State University and was sponsored by NASA-Langley, Jefferson Lab, William & Mary, the ASM International Foundation, MSEL (NIST), Norfolk State University, Air Force Research Laboratory, Boeing, the National Institute of Aerospace, and BIMat (NASA).


Spreadsheet Applications for Materials Science, X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Radiography
By: Mike Meier
This paper describes two SAMS modules dealing with x-ray diffraction and x-ray radiography.  The x-ray diffraction module provides an introduction to this topic, beginning with simple calculations of d-spacing and diffraction angles and progressing to more challenging problems such as calculating the d-spacing for any plane in any crystal system, the structure factor for any lattice, and the intensities and peak positions in powder diffraction patterns. The final project-scale exercises ask the student to import data and plot it along side of their calculated patterns. The x-ray radiography module begins with simpler exercises such as calculating the mass absorption coefficients of alloys and compounds followed by more difficult exercises that let the student explore other aspects of x-ray radiography.

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Calculation of the 5 fingers feature of the diffraction pattern of quartz.


Calculation of the several peaks one can get for a single reflection when unfiltered x-rays are used.

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Experiments in X-ray Powder Diffraction
By: Mike Meier, Kit Foo and Rita Kirchhofer
This paper describes the series of four x-ray diffraction experiments that are used in a junior-level course on the structure and characterization of materials.  The four experiments were developed as a coherent series which begins with instrument and data collection fundamentals, followed by phase identification and quantitative analysis which asks them to look at the whole pattern and the relative intensities of the peaks.  Next is a crystallite size experiment that asks the student to look at the information contained in the shapes of the peaks and finally an experiment that deals with systematic shifts in peak positions due to residual stress.

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The importance of the mass absorption coefficient in quantitative analyses is central to the second diffraction experiment.


The crystallite size experiment involves concepts of peak broadening, characteristic average sizes, and size distributions.

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Acknowledgements
The authors would like to acknowledge the support of the National Science Foundation, Course Curriculum and Laboratory Development Program Course, Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement program (Division of Undergraduate Education) for their support of the "Spreadsheet Applications..." project through grant number 0127591.

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